Past Events

Hallie & Toph Marshall and the UBC 2022 Go Global Greece class

Date: 
Thursday, May 19, 2022 - 19:00 to 20:00
Location: 
Canadian Institute, Orminiou 3A
Event Description: 

Drs. Hallie Marshall & Toph Marshall

(University of British Columbia)

&

The UBC 2022 Go Global Greece class

 

Phaethon on Film”

 

The Canadian Institute in Greece is primarily known for its support of archaeological research in Greece, but it also provides support to a Canadian students and scholars in other ways, including study abroad programs. This event will highlight one particular program that the CIG has supported — the University of British Columbia’s Go Global Greece program — and will explore the value of experiential learning opportunities and study abroad programs.

There will be a presentation by UBC students participating in the 2022 Go Global Greece program and their instructors (Drs. Hallie Marshall & Toph Marshall). This program is centred around ancient Greek choral performance and seeks to give students a sense of the poetic traditions of ancient Greece that were deeply rooted in place and cultural events and practices. The course explores ancient Greek drama beyond the confines of the traditional classroom by associating texts with particular sites in Greece and ancient performance traditions and conventions. The program also involves the production of a short film of an ancient Greek choral ode, performed in the original language. We will screen the film of the ‘Ode to Man’ from Sophocles’ Antigone, made as part of the 2018 Go Global Greece program in collaboration with UK-based non-profit Barefaced Greek.

As part of the presentation, students will also perform the ‘Dawn Chorus’ from Euripides’ fragmentary Phaethon, a film of which is being made as part of the 2022 program.

Edward Middleton

Date: 
Wednesday, March 23, 2022 - 18:30 to 19:30
Location: 
Canadian Institute, Orminiou 3A
Event Description: 

Edward Middleton (Ph.D. candidate, Department of Classics, McMaster University), "Urban Infrastructure and Resilience in Hellenistic Thessaly"

Over the course of the Classical and Hellenistic periods, Greek poleis developed an architectural vocabulary which was used to physically define the concept of the Polis. This vocabulary was deployed across the Greek world during the Hellenistic period, when the Successors of Alexander the Great used it while founding, refounding, and synoecizing numerous urban centers in attempts to consolidate their empires. By analysing the known archaeological and epigraphic evidence from Thessaly, I argue that even in a region considered peripheral and “late” to develop in antiquity, the architectural vocabulary of the polis was being used by Hellenistic monarchs and local elites as it was in other regions of the Hellenistic world.

Yet, not all of these sites became important centers. Some were quickly abandoned, their populations dispersing to the countryside and other cities. While the monarchs attempted to centralize and consolidate people and power, it seems that this was not always possible as the diffusion of people led to abandonment and depopulation of those sites deemed unfavorable. By tracking the development of urban infrastructure across Thessaly, I hope to understand what made for favorable, resilient cities, why some flourished and others were abandoned soon after foundation.

Katerina Apokatanidis

Date: 
Wednesday, February 23, 2022 - 18:30 to 19:30
Location: 
Canadian Institute, Orminiou 3A
Event Description: 

Katerina Apokatanidis (Neda and Franz Leipen Fellow, The Canadian Institute in Greece; PhD candidate in Classical Archaeology, University of Toronto) “Greek Funerary Religion: The Case-Study of the Orphic Gold Tablets”

My talk discusses the funerary aspect of the Orphic cult practice. This cult is visible in the material record via the tombs of the worshippers of an Orphic version of Dionysos whose myth in this context goes beyond what we know from Hesiod. The Orphic worshippers were buried with the so-called Orphic Gold Tablets somewhere on their person. These gold tablets date from the late Archaic all the way to the Roman Imperial era and contain unique tidbits of information on life in the Underworld. For the purposes of this talk I will be presenting two case-studies from the corpus of tombs which have yielded an Orphic tablet, one from modern-day Larisa and the other from modern-day Rethymno. This research forms part of the topic of my PhD dissertation and aims to situate the Orphic tablets within their archaeological context, where this is not lost. With this project I hope to enrich our understanding of the funerary aspect of the Orphic cult previously understood to be operating on the fringes of official religion in Ancient Greece.

Craig I. Hardiman

Date: 
Monday, December 6, 2021 - 18:30 to 19:30
Location: 
Canadian Institute, Orminiou 3A
Event Description: 

Dr. Craig I. Hardiman (Associate Professor, Department of Classical Studies, University of Waterloo), "Video Games and the Classical Past: Problems, Potential and Pedagogy"

The use of Ancient Greece and Ancient Rome as settings in video games has a long, and perhaps checkered, past. Archaeology especially has often been used as a means to find an object, solve a quest or solve a puzzle, and characters such as Lara Croft have long blurred the lines between treasure hunting and archaeology. Even while some games attempt a certain amount of archaeological and/or historical accuracy in architecture or surroundings, it is often within a game that presents fantastical or outlandish characters and circumstances, often with a mythological base. Some games, such as the Assassin’s Creed series by Ubisoft, have attempted to address some of these issues. Two of their games, Assassin’s Creed: Origins (2017) and Assassin’s Creed: Odyssey (2018), dealing with (respectively) events at the end of Ptolemaic Egypt and the Peloponnesian War, have tried to craft an “accurate” vision of antiquity. So much so that they tout using the game as an educational tool for the classroom. Yet Ubisoft themselves discuss choices they had to make between accuracy and fun gameplay. One can encounter as many historical inaccuracies and anachronisms in these games as not. With an increased emphasis on “gaming” the classroom (using games as a pedagogical tool), can we fully trust the broad view of Ancient Greece and Rome to for-profit companies whose first duty is to the creation of fun gameplay? These issues and others will be explored, alongside games that (mis)represent a “classical past”.

Gerald P. Schaus

Date: 
Monday, October 25, 2021 - 19:00 to 20:00
Location: 
The Canadian Institute in Greece, Orminiou 3A
Event Description: 

Dr. Gerald P. Schaus (Professor Emeritus, Department of Archaeology and Heritage Studies, Wilfrid Laurier University), "Sadly, a Looted Cave Sanctuary High Above Stymphalia, Arkadia"

A remote rock shelter formed by drainage from a small bowl-like valley high on Mt. Oligyrtos in northeastern Arkadia attracted worshippers for a period of about 200 years (ca. 575 – 375 BCE). The site has been pillaged by looters seeking valuable antiquities over the past thirty years. Some material salvaged from surface debris left by the looters provides clues about the cult and its worshippers. Pottery, figurines and jewelry form the bulk of the debris. The identity of the cult, its history and ritual practices, its place in local inter-polis relations and its protection from ancient thievery are subjects of consideration.

Canadian Institute Open Meeting

Date: 
Wednesday, June 9, 2021 - 19:00 to 20:00
Location: 
https://umontreal.zoom.us/j/85791821021?pwd=eXVVUDgwZi9aQW84OTFmVDVDdTh3UT09
Event Description: 

Annual Report of the Canadian Institute in Greece

Conférence annuelle de l’Institut canadien en Grèce

Ετήσιος Απολογισμός του Καναδικού Ινστιτούτου στην Ελλάδα

 

09/06/2021 – 19.00 (Greece/ Grèce/ Ελλάδα) / 12.00 (EST)

 

Zoom:

https://umontreal.zoom.us/j/85791821021?pwd=eXVVUDgwZi9aQW84OTFmVDVDdTh3UT09

 

 

Zoe Delibasis (Cultural Program Manager)

“The Cultural Activities of the Canadian Institute in Greece 2019-21”

 

Prof. Jacques Perreault (Director)

“The Research Activities of the Canadian Institute in Greece 2019-21”

 

 

Help us support Canadian research and cultural initiatives in Greece

Aidez-nous en appuyant nos recherches et nos activités culturelles en Grèce
Βοηθήστε μας να στηρίξουμε τις καναδικές ερευνητικές και πολιτιστικές πρωτοβουλίες στην Ελλάδα
 

https://tinyurl.com/2rj7nwfd
Your donation counts! Votre don est important! Η δωρεά σας είναι σημαντική!

Laure Sarah Ethier Boutet

Date: 
Wednesday, May 19, 2021 - 19:00 to 20:00
Location: 
https://umontreal.zoom.us/j/87858000530?pwd=Sk0zblprSjI0dDNKclpDalNUTE9kUT09
Event Description: 

Laure Sarah Ethier Boutet

Boursière Elisabeth Alföldi-Rosenbaum de l’Institut canadien en Grèce

et doctorante en histoire à l’Université de Montréal

Argilos après Philippe II: Occupation hellénistique et gestion du territoire

Suite à sa conquête par Philippe II en 357 av. n.è., le site d’Argilos a révélé une toute dernière phase d’occupation, dont témoigne la construction sur l’acropole d’un imposant manoir.  À partir du règne de Philippe II, il est coutume pour les souverains macédoniens d’octroyer les terres conquises à leurs compagnons (hetairoi), pour assurer leur fidélité ainsi que la surveillance et le développement économique du territoire. Le manoir d’Argilos se démarque comme l’un des rares cas identifiés de ce type d’installation.

Grâce à l’étude préliminaire du mobilier archéologique, cette communication aborde la fonction économique et le caractère défensif de l’occupation hellénistique d’Argilos, afin de mettre en lumière le fonctionnement et la gestion de ce système de distribution des terres en Macédoine.

https://umontreal.zoom.us/j/87858000530?pwd=Sk0zblprSjI0dDNKclpDalNUTE9kUT09

Jacques Bouchard

Date: 
Tuesday, March 30, 2021 - 19:00 to 20:00
Location: 
https://tinyurl.com/4bjvbvkp
Event Description: 

Καθηγητής Jacques Bouchard (Langues et Culture Néo-helléniques, Département de littératures et de langues du monde, Université de Montréal), "Οι φιλέλληνες του γαλλόφωνου Καναδά και η απελευθερωμένη Ελλάδα"

Τα ανδραγαθήματα των Ελλήνων αγωνιστών κατά την περίοδο της Επανάστασης του 1821 βρήκαν απήχηση στις γαλλόφωνες εφημερίδες του Κεμπέκ και του Μοντρεάλ και πιθανόν να ενέπνευσαν τους Κεμπεκιανούς Πατριώτες της εξέγερσης του 1837. Στα 1837 ακριβώς τυπώνεται για χρήση του Κολεγίου του Μοντρεάλ η πρώτη γραμματική της αρχαίας ελληνικής με νεοελληνική προφορά. Δύο χρόνια μετά ο Joly de Lotbinière επισκέπτεται την Ελλάδα και τραβάει ίσως την πρώτη φωτογραφία του Παρθενώνα με δαγκεροτυπία (1839). Ακολουθεί η επίσκεψη στην Αθήνα μερικών γαλλόφωνων περιηγητών από το Κεμπέκ, που περιγράφουν στα οδοιπορικά τους την πρόσφατα απελευθερωμένη Ελλάδα.

Zoom: https://tinyurl.com/4bjvbvkp

Tristan Carter

Date: 
Wednesday, February 24, 2021 - 19:00 to 20:00
Location: 
https://umontreal.zoom.us/j/93257451161?pwd=cDZHVTZKa0d5VnJvMTJVRDh5TlFzdz09
Event Description: 

Professor Tristan Carter (Department of Anthropology, McMaster University), "The Colonisation of the Aegean Islands and the Global Origins of Seafaring: New Data from Naxos and Crete"

Today the only human inhabitants of the earth are us Homo sapiens, yet not so long ago we lived alongside other members of our species, such as the Neanderthals and Denisovans. What makes us special? Why did we survive and the others die out? In this talk we discuss some of the claimed evolutionary ‘winning strategies’ associated with Homo sapiens, focusing on seafaring and the colonisation of islands, and the recent challenges to the theory from work on Crete and Flores that only modern humans were capable of boat building and maritime exploration. The talk ultimately focuses on work being conducted at Stelida on Naxos by the Canadian Institute in Greece, and how the discoveries at Stelida are contributing to this debate of global significance.

To be held via Zoom: https://umontreal.zoom.us/j/93257451161?pwd=cDZHVTZKa0d5VnJvMTJVRDh5TlFzdz09

Webinar by Devon Lorasbe

Date: 
Wednesday, December 16, 2020 - 20:00 to 22:00
Location: 
https://uvic.zoom.us/j/86836155069
Event Description: 

Devon Lorasbe (M.A., University of Victoria), "Virtual Learning Resources from the Eastern Boeotia Archaeological Project"

This talk will present an overview of our learning resource development so far, for both learners and educators. Our resources use engaging pedagogical strategies and interactive digital tools to present ancient Boeotia and Eleon as a case study for learning about the ancient Greek world.

Zoom meeting: https://uvic.zoom.us/j/86836155069

Poster: www.cig-icg.gr/sites/default/files/docs/2020_12_16_Lohrasbe_webinar.pdf

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